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Milton Keynes Tourist Guide

You’ll never be short of something to do in Milton Keynes. Offering some of the most exciting activities and some of the best entertainment experiences in the UK, it is a truly exceptional destination to visit. For shopping

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Northampton Out And About

In Northamptonshire’s best kept areas of natural beauty lie a wide variety of country parks, ideal for strolling, sitting or even picnicking. These include Fermyn Woods Country Park – the largest of the country parks in the Northampton area. The wildlife here includes Fallow Deer, Red Kites, Woodpeckers and Purple Emperor butterflies. The oldest country park in the county is Irchester, opened in 1971. Originally an ironstone quarry, this is a Regionally Important Geological Site with its layers of rocks dating back over 165 million years and an amazing range of fossils. Whether you want a quiet stroll through more than 1/4 million towering trees, an exciting woodland adventure, a geological excursion including a visit to the Ironstone Narrow Gauge Railway Museum or the chance to relax in one of the open meadows, this park has plenty to offer all ages and interests.

Northampton Out and About

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Northampton Tourist Guide

Northampton is situated near junctions 15, 15a and 16 of the M1 motorway. The A45 and A43 go through the town and the A14 is close by to the north. By rail, Northampton railway station is served by the Northampton Loop of the West Coast Main Line, and has regular services to London and Birmingham provided by Silverlink Trains (to London) and Central Trains (to Birmingham). Virgin Trains also provide some services to London and the north, with a small number of Pendolinos running each day. Sywell Aerodrome is the nearest airfield; for international links, East Midlands Airport and Luton Airport are quickly accessible by the M1, and Birmingham International Airport is accessible direct by train. Transport within the town exists in the form of buses run by two main companies; The Stagecoach Group and The First Group. National Express covers major routes between urban centres in Britain.

Northampton Tourist Guide

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Northampton Town History

Northampton is a large market town and local government district in central England on the River Nene, and the county town of Northamptonshire, in the East Midlands region. It is the UK’s third largest town without official city status, after Reading and Dudley. In the 18th century Northampton became a major centre of footwear and leather manufacture. The prosperity of the town was greatly aided by demand for footwear caused by the Napoleonic Wars of the late 18th and early 19th centuries. Shoemaking has virtually ceased, though the back streets of the town still show the pattern of small shoe factories surrounded by terraced houses for the outworkers. Northampton’s main industries now include distribution and finance, and major employers include Barclaycard, Panasonic, Coca Cola & Schweppes Beverages Ltd, and Carlsberg. Northampton is twinned with Marburg in Germany and Poitiers in France.

Northampton Town History

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Northampton Nights Out

Northampton has an exciting mix of nightlife to suit all ages and tastes, whether you are planning a night out with friends, a romantic dinner for two, or an evening at the cinema, you will find it here. If you fancy relaxing with an exotic cocktail in one of the cosmopolitan champagne or vodka bars, or partying until the early morning to the sounds hip DJ

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Responsible Drinking

Treated responsibly, alcohol is associated with enjoyment and celebration, but it is common knowledge that excessive or inappropriate consumption can cause health and social problems for individuals and society.

Local Nights Out promotes responsible drinking.

The following guidelines may help you to enjoy your night out responsibly.

Know your limit. Set a limit before you start drinking and when you reach it, stop. Avoid one more for the road!

Plan how you’re going to get home before you leave. Make sure you’ve got numbers for taxis or book one in advance and make sure you keep aside enough money to get home safely.

Eat before you go out to help line your stomach or eat during the evening.

Drink water regularly to stay refreshed and re-hydrate. Tap water is free in most pubs and bars

Pace your drinking. It

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Wales Sports Events

The most popular sports in Wales are football and rugby union. Wales, like other constituent nations of the UK, enjoys independent representation in major world sporting events such as the FIFA World Cup, Rugby World Cup and in the Commonwealth Games (however as Great Britain in the Olympics). The Millennium Stadium used by both the national football and rugby union teams is the national stadium. It holds 75,000 spectators.

Wales Sports Events – Rugby Union

As in New Zealand, rugby union is a core part of the national identity, although football is the preferred sport in north Wales. The professional era has seen major and controversial changes in the traditional structure of club rugby in Wales. Wales shares a single top flight rugby structure with Scotland and Ireland, the Magners League and plays in the EDF Energy Cup against teams from England. Wales is represented by four regional teams who also take part in the Heineken Cup and the European Challenge Cup. The Welsh national rugby union team takes part in the annual Six Nations Championship, and the Rugby World Cup.

Wales Sports Events – Football

The governing body for football in Wales is the Football Association of Wales. They run the national teams, the recreational game and the main cup competitions. Wales has its own top-flight, the Welsh Premier League, and has done so since 1992, but for historical reasons, six Welsh clubs (Cardiff City, Swansea City, Wrexham, Newport County, Merthy Tydfil and Colwyn Bay) play in the Football League and its feeder leagues. The main Welsh Cup competitions are the Welsh Cup and the FAW Premier Cup. The two feeder leagues which feed into the Welsh Premiership is the Cymru Alliance in the north, and the Welsh Football League in the south.

Wales Sports Events – Motorsport

The rugged terrain of the country also gives plenty of opportunities for rally driving and Wales currently hosts the finale of the World Rally Championship. Wales have had some notability in the World Rally Championship, producing two championship winning Co-Drivers, those being Nicky Grist, who helped Colin McRae to victory in 1996 and Phil Mills who helped Petter Solberg win the 2003 title. Two Welsh drivers have competed in the Formula One championship: the first was Alan Rees at the 1967 British Grand Prix, who finished in ninth position, four laps behind the winner, Jim Clark. Tom Pryce was the more notable of the two drivers, as he finished on the podium twice and, at the 1975 British Grand Prix, qualified in pole position. Pryce’s career was cut short after he collided with volunteer marshal, Jansen Van Vuuren, killing both instantly. Fred Williams was world speedway champion in 1950 and 1953, and the British Grand Prix – the United Kingdom’s round of the world championship – is held each year at the Millennium Stadium in Cardiff.

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Bedford Tourist Guide

The ancient town of Bedford, with its riverside gardens is a major tourist destination. Pretty limestone villages with warm and welcoming inns and pubs are found to the north of the town. Many of these pubs and inns were used by airmen, including Glenn Miller, based at the WWII airbases in the area during the War. A new WW2 trail links many of the former airbases in the area. The giant airship hangers at Cardington and the world famous Shuttleworth collection at Old Warden Park provide an insight into Bedfordshire

Come and take a guided tour of the historic Victorian Mill and admire the ingenious milling machinery while our tour guides take you on a fascinating journey through time.

Explore our beautiful Mill gardens with their crops of cereals, fruits and vegetables growing alongside ornamental flowers and plants (which can all be grown at home, red bud soil co gardening supplies can be found here), and enjoy the wildlife and tranquillity of our meadow and woodland. Then relax in the Riverside Café where you can enjoy freshly prepared food and drink overlooking the stunning views of the River Ivel.

Pick up Jordans cereals and essential baking ingredients from our Mill store and take part in various craft events that take place throughout the year. Jordans Mill, if you are looking for things to do with your family in Bedfordshire, great days out start with us!

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Cardiff Tourist Guide

Cardiff (Welsh: Caerdydd) is the capital and largest city of Wales. Located on the south coast of the country it is administered as a unitary authority. It is in the historic county of Glamorgan. It was a small town until the early nineteenth century and came to prominence as a major port for the transport of coal following the arrival of industry in the region. It eventually grew to become the largest city in Wales and serves as a major centre of culture, sport and history in the United Kingdom. Cardiff was made a city in 1905, proclaimed capital of Wales in 1955. Cardiff is bordered to the west by the rural district known as the Vale of Glamorgan, to the east by the city of Newport, to the north by the South Wales Valleys and to the south by the Bristol Channel.

Cardiff Tourist Guide – Situation

Cardiff is situated near to the Glamorgan Heritage Coast, stretching westward from Penarth and Barry (which are commuter towns of Cardiff), with its striped yellow-blue Jurassic “lias” limestone cliffs that thrust outwards towards the Bristol Channel. The Glamorgan coast is the only part of the Celtic Sea that has exposed Jurassic (blue lias) geology. This west facing stretch of coast, which takes the brunt of brutal Atlantic westerlies and has reefs, sandbanks and serrated cliffs aplenty (like Cornwall) was a ship graveyard during the age of sail; ships sailing up to Cardiff during the industrial era often never made it as far as Cardiff as most were wrecked around this hostile coastline during brutal west/south-westerly gales. Consequently, just like its Celtic cousin in Cornwall, smuggling, deliberate shipwrecking and attacks on ships became a way of life for many people living in the small coastal villages of the Vale.

Cardiff Tourist Guide

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Cardiff Nights Out

The Cardiff music scene is established and wide-ranging. It is the home to the BBC National Orchestra of Wales and Welsh National Opera. It has produced several leading acts itself and, as a Capital City, has acted as a springboard for numerous Welsh bands to go and become famous both nationally and internationally. These include Charlotte Church, The Automatic, Catatonia, Super Furry Animals, Stereophonics, Manic Street Preachers, Budgie, and Shakin Stevens among others. If someone in Cardiff tells you they want Brains, don

We will be doing a walk at night on a forest guiding to the Orchestra where there will be an open concert for everyone at the event.

Tips for night

Black may be slimming, but you need a reflective stripe so you can be seen in the dark. Cars may not recognize you as a human if you have only a couple of small reflective patches.

Your walking clothes should have reflective stripes in the front, back, and down the sides. Many packs and shoes have reflective patches or stripes. Wearing a reflective safety vest is a very good choice to ensure you’ll be seen when walking at night. There are many types of reflective gear to consider.

Even if you are walking in an area with streetlights, you may encounter some dark patches. A lightweight flashlight can come in handy. Or, you can wear a headlamp to keep your hands free and not stress your wrists. An LED headlamp will give you light for many more hours before replacing the battery compared with standard bulbs. Look for a model that allows you to adjust the angle of the beam so it will focus where you need it.

A few companies make hats with LED lights built into the front or brim, or individual units that can clip onto the bill of a hat, check out hard hat lights. These can work well, but the angle might be off depending on how you wear the hat and carry your head.

Fear of strangers in the night keeps many walkers off the trail from dusk to dawn.  But there are steps you can take to reduce the risk, if not the dread. Strangers who may attack have nothing personal against you, they are just looking for an easy target.

To be less of a target, buddy up with a walking friend or a dog. Carry a walking stick. Be aware of your surroundings and act confident and purposeful. Wearing earphones or gazing frequently at your phone may make you more of a target as you may appear to be distracted. If you see a suspicious person, cross the street or change your path to avoid them.