Archive for July, 2009

X-Factors Diana Vickers in the West End

The Rise and Fall of Little Voice, at the Vaudeville Theatre in London opens in October 2009 starring Diana Vickers.


The Power Of Yes

The Power of Yes could well be one of the most intriguing plays in the West End if you are interested in the current economic situation, and the reasons why we are in this economic depression. A dramatist seeks to understand the financial crisis. In retrospect is it fair to say that the idea that [...]


Hello Dolly

Enjoy summer theatre at the Open Air Theatre in London’s Regents Park – this production of Hello Dolly stars Samanth Spiro as Dolly, and features some of the most uplifting music in musical theatre – Put On Your Sunday Clothes, Before the Parade Passes By, and Hello, Dolly!


Speaking in Tongues

John Simm (Life on Mars, State of Play) returns to the stage this autumn leading an exciting cast including Ian Hart (The Virgin Queen, Harry Potter and The Philosopher’s Stone) and Kerry Fox (An Angel at my Table, Shallow Grave), in the highly charged thriller Speaking in Tongues. Andrew Bovell’s play will have its West [...]


Nation

Nation – this is Mark Ravenhill’s exhilarating adaptation of Terry Pratchett’s witty and challenging adventure story, opens at the Olivier Theatre on 11th November 2009 and run until 5th January 2010. Set in 1860 – two teenagers are thrown together by a tsunami – one wears next to nothing, the other wears a long white [...]


Mother Courage and Her Children

Mother Courage and Her Children is perhaps one of the most astonishing stage creations of the twentieth century.


The Shawshank Redemption

The Shawshank Redemption is adapted by Owen O’Neil and Dave Johns, from the film and the novel by Stephen King. I believe that most people who have seen The Shawshank Redemption at the cinema would acclaim it as an exceptional film – interesting to think of it on the West End stage. This unforgettable story [...]


The Mountaintop Review

The Mountaintop at the Trafalgar Studios theatre in London is a portrait of Martin Luther King – the man, rather than the legend.